Posted by on Aug 22, 2017 in Biking, Food, Friends, Gallery, Hiking, Washington | 28 comments

As we stood on the bluff overlooking Dungeness Spit, I said to Eric, “No way am I hiking out to the lighthouse. Why would anyone want to trudge five miles down a sandy spit, and then turn around and endure the same tedious five miles back?” Two days later, we made the trek. And we’re glad we did.

It helped a lot that we were able to lure our friends Pam and John into hiking with us. A 10-mile hike on a sandy spit with nothing but gulls and driftwood could be tiresome—or meditative, depending on your frame of mind. (Oh, and there’s an additional half-mile to actually get to the spit, making the hike 11 miles in total.) But factor in good company, and the miles fly by.

An aerial view of Dungeness Spit; 5 miles one-way to the lighthouse (image courtesy of Wikipedia)

The hike must be timed to coincide with low tide, lest you find yourself stumbling over rocks and driftwood on the return trip. We met up early for our adventure on a beautiful late June morning. Maintaining a brisk pace and with no lack of conversational topics (don’t ever play Beatles trivia with John—you will lose), we arrived at the lighthouse in about two hours.

Our most exotic bird sightings were gulls (and lots of them)

We had a beautiful day for our hike

The lighthouse comes into view, but there’s still a long way to go

Here’s an interesting tidbit: Dungeness Spit is the longest naturally occurring sand spit in the United States and one of the longest in the world. Another tidbit: The lighthouse was originally one-sixth of a mile from the tip of the spit. But the spit continues to grow, and the lighthouse now sits approximately one-half mile from the end of the spit. We had no desire to hike to the tip of the spit. Getting to the lighthouse was good enough for us.

We were given a choice; Serenity or Reality

New Dungeness Spit Lighthouse and the light keeper’s house

New Dungeness Spit Lighthouse

Looks like the wind always blows from the west

It’s a lovely lighthouse, in pristine condition. Built in 1857, it was the first in the Strait of San Juan de Fuca. It still acts as a beacon for sailors today, although sadly (at least to my way of thinking), a utilitarian acrylic lens replaced the original beautiful glass prism Fresnel lens in 1976.

Pam and John head in for the tour

Inside the New Dungeness Spit Lighthouse

The original Fresnel lens from Cape Flattery Lighthouse on Tatoosh Island, near Neah Bay

From the top of the lighthouse (wish the lighthouse still had the original Fresnel lens)

A view of the light keeper’s house from the lighthouse

If you’re not in the mood for an 11-mile round trip hike, you can get a ride if you pay $375 a week to stay in the light keeper’s house as a volunteer (along with 4-6 other paying volunteers). Responsibilities include staffing the lighthouse, giving tours, raising and lowering the flag, mowing the lawn, and polishing the brass. The volunteer program keeps the lighthouse staffed year round, and prevents the vandalism that typically befalls lighthouses that no longer have a full-time keeper.

Heading back from our lighthouse adventure

Gulls picturesquely posed against the mountains

Our campground at Dungeness Recreation Area was just a few miles from Sequim, and we were looking forward to visiting the lavender fields. Sequim is famous for its many lavender farms—it has the perfect Mediterranean climate for growing the fragrant herb. We’ve twice been in mid-July for the annual Sequim Lavender Festival. In late June, the lavender was a faint hint of the beauty to come, but we still enjoyed wandering the fields at Purple Haze Lavender Farm. The last time we were here, we indulged in lavender infused gin and tonics while we strolled the fields. This time, there were no gin and tonics offered. We made do with lavender ice cream.

Lavender fields at Purple Haze Lavender Farm

Beautiful poppies and delphinium in Purple Haze gardens

“Peace”

Our other adventures in our three days in Sequim included biking another portion of the Olympic Discovery Trail, this time from the campground to the Dungeness River Audubon Center. We also indulged in a strawberry picking extravaganza at Graymarsh Berry Farm. It never looks like a lot of berries until you get them home. Lastly, we enjoyed a delicious lunch at Nourish Sequim, a delightful farm-to-table restaurant with beautiful gardens.

Railroad bridge at Dungeness River Audubon Center

A brilliant Western Tanager along the trail

Picking strawberries at Graymarsh Berry Farm

The beautiful gardens at Nourish Sequim, a farm-to-table restaurant

Grilled local salmon sandwiches and salads from the garden

About the campground:

Dungeness Recreation Area is a wonderful county campground less than 10 miles from Sequim. There are no hookups, but the location makes up for the lack of amenities (it’s not completely roughing it; there are bathrooms, showers, potable water, a dump station, and even good Verizon coverage). Our site was perched at the edge of the bluff, with peek-a-boo views of the Strait of San Juan de Fuca. You can choose full sun sites or shady sites (the website offers helpful descriptions), and most of the sites are spacious and private.

Walking trails skirt the bluff, the sunsets are wonderful, and Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge is walking distance from the campground. So is the lighthouse, if you’re in the mood for an adventure.

Dungeness Recreation Area

This was probably the most spacious campsite we’ve ever had

Next Up: Port Townsend And Beyond

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