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Inside Taos

Inside Taos

Posted by on Nov 10, 2013 in Art, Colorado, Food, Friends, Gallery, New Mexico, Travel | 4 comments

Okay, so I suspect these circa 1950’s salt-and-pepper shakers are not politically correct. Nonetheless, they are so kitschy that they’re really cute, and I find myself wanting a pair of my very own. They adorned our table at The Dragonfly, a locavore-downhome-gourmet café in Taos. The food was fabulous, as was our entire visit. Which was much too short, at only two nights and one full day.

(On our way to Taos, we spent a couple of nights in Pagosa Springs—we were ready for a bit of civilization after the remoteness of Goblin Valley and Cedar Mesa. A good long soak in the hot springs and a wonderful dinner out at The Alley Grille hit the spot.)

Back to Taos. We’ve been several times, and always love it. The combination of cobalt skies, adobe architecture, art, creative food, and the Native American-Spanish-Anglo triad of cultures make for a fascinating and beautiful tapestry.

We visited the lovely San Francisco de Assisi Mission Church just outside of Taos—it’s the iconic church that was much painted by Georgia O’Keefe and photographed by Ansel Adams. We explored the downtown plaza area, browsed galleries, bookstores, and shops, and enjoyed lunch at The Dragonfly.

We also spent a delightful evening with our friends Kim and Rick (she’s a talented vegan chef, and made a delicious cauliflower crust pizza) and in several hours of relaxing at their beautiful home, barely scratched the surface of catching up with them since our visit last fall. So we continued on the next evening, meeting up at the venerable Taos Inn for open mic night (some very good local musicians, including a banjo player and an unassuming young guy who sounded remarkably like Cat Stevens—followed by an absolutely atrocious trio who couldn’t play or sing, but were soliciting tips for food). We then moved on to the Treehouse Café for drinks and a late night meal; I think those were the best shrimp tacos I’ve ever eaten.

It was so much fun to experience more of the town with Kim and Rick, and to get a bit of the “insider” view of Taos. They’re in transition, making plans to move to Portland and looking to buy an RV, but we all agreed that we want to meet up again soon, whether it be in Taos, Ashland, Portland, or somewhere on the road.

Inside Taos

Campsite On The River Pagosa Springs

Crossing The River Behind Our Campsite

Pagosa Springs

Hot Springs Pools

Pagosa Springs Shop

Mandalas

Bottle Cap Art

Dinner At The Alley House Grille

Spinach Salad At The Alley House Grille

Campsite Taos

Visiting Rick & Kim

Sunset At Kim & Rick's

Church of St. Francis de Assisi

Eric Photographing Church

St. Francis Welcome

Taos Turquoise And Adobe

Folk Art Icons

Taos Window

On The Plaza In Taos

Fine Art In Taos

Kimosabe

Artist's Coop In Taos

Dragonfly Cafe Taos

Inside The Dragonfly Cafe

Enchiladas At The Dragonfly Cafe

Homemade At The Dragonfly

Taos Inn

Banjo At Open Mic Night

Open Mic At Taos Inn

Listening To Music And Knitting

Late Night At The Treehouse

Delicious Tacos At The Treehouse

Inside Taos
Campsite On The River Pagosa Springs
Crossing The River Behind Our Campsite
Pagosa Springs
Hot Springs Pools
Pagosa Springs Shop
Mandalas
Bottle Cap Art
Dinner At The Alley House Grille
Spinach Salad At The Alley House Grille
Campsite Taos
Visiting Rick & Kim
Sunset At Kim & Rick's
Church of St. Francis de Assisi
Eric Photographing Church
St. Francis Welcome
Taos Turquoise And Adobe
Folk Art Icons
Taos Window
On The Plaza In Taos
Fine Art In Taos
Kimosabe
Artist's Coop In Taos
Dragonfly Cafe Taos
Inside The Dragonfly Cafe
Enchiladas At The Dragonfly Cafe
Homemade At The Dragonfly
Taos Inn
Banjo At Open Mic Night
Open Mic At Taos Inn
Listening To Music And Knitting
Late Night At The Treehouse
Delicious Tacos At The Treehouse
Inside Taos  thumbnail
Campsite On The River Pagosa Springs  thumbnail
Crossing The River Behind Our Campsite  thumbnail
Pagosa Springs  thumbnail
Hot Springs Pools  thumbnail
Pagosa Springs Shop  thumbnail
Mandalas  thumbnail
Bottle Cap Art  thumbnail
Dinner At The Alley House Grille  thumbnail
Spinach Salad At The Alley House Grille  thumbnail
Campsite Taos  thumbnail
Visiting Rick & Kim  thumbnail
Sunset At Kim & Rick's  thumbnail
Church of St. Francis de Assisi thumbnail
Eric Photographing Church  thumbnail
St. Francis Welcome thumbnail
Taos Turquoise And Adobe  thumbnail
Folk Art Icons  thumbnail
Taos Window  thumbnail
On The Plaza In Taos  thumbnail
Fine Art In Taos  thumbnail
Kimosabe  thumbnail
Artist's Coop In Taos  thumbnail
Dragonfly Cafe Taos  thumbnail
Inside The Dragonfly Cafe  thumbnail
Enchiladas At The Dragonfly Cafe  thumbnail
Homemade At The Dragonfly  thumbnail
Taos Inn  thumbnail
Banjo At Open Mic Night  thumbnail
Open Mic At Taos Inn  thumbnail
Listening To Music And Knitting  thumbnail
Late Night At The Treehouse  thumbnail
Delicious Tacos At The Treehouse  thumbnail

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Soaking In Pagosa Springs

Soaking In Pagosa Springs

Posted by on Sep 28, 2012 in Colorado, Gallery, Travel | 2 comments

“This one is too hot!”—“This one is too cold!” —“Ahhh…this one is just right.” That was our conversation when we were trying to choose the perfect hot springs pool.

When we’re traveling through southern Colorado, we always try to make a stop at The Springs, a beautiful hot springs resort in Pagosa Springs, Colorado. There are almost two dozen pools to choose from, varying in temperature from about 83 degrees (the swimming pool) to 114 degrees, which is appropriately named the Lobster Pot.

Somewhere between 100 and 105 degrees is what we both like best—just hot enough to get really relaxed and to soak away any soreness from hiking and traveling. We spent several hours wandering between pools, and finally settled in one that was just the right temperature, overlooking the San Juan River.

We watched the sun set over the river, and then very slowly made our way back to our campground at Pagosa Riverside, just a few miles outside of town. Dinner was already prepared, which was a good thing, because after hours of hot springs soaking the most we could muster was to heat up tortillas to go along with the coffee-braised pork that had been simmering all day in the slow cooker.

Soaking In Pagosa Springs

Nice Afternoon For Soaking

View From A Pool

Just Right

Wading To The Cliff Pools

Relaxing

Campsite Pagosa Springs

Coffee Braised Pork Tacos

 Soaking In Pagosa Springs
 Nice Afternoon For Soaking
 View From A Pool
 Just Right
 Wading To The Cliff Pools
 Relaxing
  Campsite Pagosa Springs
 Coffee Braised Pork Tacos
 Soaking In Pagosa Springs  thumbnail
 Nice Afternoon For Soaking  thumbnail
 View From A Pool  thumbnail
 Just Right  thumbnail
 Wading To The Cliff Pools  thumbnail
 Relaxing  thumbnail
  Campsite Pagosa Springs  thumbnail
 Coffee Braised Pork Tacos  thumbnail

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Enjoying The Aspens In Mancos

Enjoying The Aspens In Mancos

Posted by on Sep 27, 2012 in Birding, Colorado, Gallery, Hiking, Travel | 4 comments

Ever heard of Mancos, Colorado? Neither had we. Driving through on Hwy 160, the town looks like absolutely nothing. But take a right turn and go one block, and a vibrant little town suddenly appears, with a fantastic natural foods store, an excellent bakery and coffee shop, bookstore, artist’s co-op, and a thriving, friendly community scene (population 1,336).

We were ready for a couple of nights of civilized camping (that means water and electric hook-ups) after our rustic time in Hovenweep and Canyonlands; we also didn’t have a lot of choice, because at this elevation (8,000 feet plus) the forest service campgrounds close by mid-September. We ended up at Echo Basin Ranch, which was just on the verge of shutting down for the season. It was great—only a half-dozen other hardy souls there, which meant that we had plenty of elbow room.

It’s a beautiful place; if you overlook the misguided notion that someone had to install the world’s first AstroTurf golf course on the grounds. Fortunately, that’s a small part of the ranch, and the bright green artificial grass sort of blends into the surroundings if you don’t look too closely.

We loved our site that backed up to a view of horse pastures and mountains, and enjoyed gorgeous sunsets both nights we were there. Best of all was the hiking, just a few miles up the road into the mountains. The aspens were in peak form, thousands of acres of shimmering golden leaves. And the birding was stellar—lots of birds that we don’t ordinarily see, including Lewis’ woodpeckers, pygmy nuthatches, and mountain bluebirds.

We intended to stop for only one night, but liked the area so much that we remained an additional night. There’s so much hiking nearby, and the town is so appealing, that if we had more time we would have happily stayed another few days.

By the way, if you visit Utah or Colorado, BYOB. You can’t buy decent beer or wine at the grocery stores because state regulations limit the alcohol content, which makes for some nasty tasting beverages. Bring your own, or you’ll end up at some very interesting state-run liquor stores.

Enjoying The Aspens In Mancos

View From Our Campsite

Eric's New Friend

Crazy Abert's Squirrels

Hiking The Ramparts Trail

Trail Of Gold

Colors And Clouds

Inspired Photographer

Downtown Mancos

Funky And Fun Mancos Bakery

Excellent Natural Foods Store

 Enjoying The Aspens In Mancos
 View From Our Campsite
 Eric's New Friend
 Crazy Abert's Squirrels
 Hiking The Ramparts Trail
 Trail Of Gold
 Colors And Clouds
 Inspired Photographer
 Downtown Mancos
 Funky And Fun Mancos Bakery
 Excellent Natural Foods Store
 Enjoying The Aspens In Mancos thumbnail
 View From Our Campsite  thumbnail
 Eric's New Friend  thumbnail
 Crazy Abert's Squirrels  thumbnail
 Hiking The Ramparts Trail  thumbnail
 Trail Of Gold  thumbnail
 Colors And Clouds thumbnail
 Inspired Photographer  thumbnail
 Downtown Mancos  thumbnail
 Funky And Fun Mancos Bakery  thumbnail
 Excellent Natural Foods Store  thumbnail

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