Posted by on Nov 2, 2013 in Gallery, Travel, Utah | 14 comments

Often, I see a photo of a place and I say to Eric, “I want to go there.” That’s how we came to visit the House On Fire ruin. It’s a relatively unknown ancient Anasazi dwelling, but it ranks among the most beautiful ruins that we’ve visited.

What makes this eight hundred year old ruin so spectacular is the way the light plays off of the sandstone, making it appear as though the ruins are engulfed in flames. But the flames only appear in photographs, and only when the light is just right. So not only was I determined to visit this ruin, but we had to get there when the light was perfect.

House On Fire is located in Mule Canyon, on Cedar Mesa in southeastern Utah. It’s an area we’ve not previously explored, and as we discovered, it’s a territory rich with ancient ruins that are generally unmarked, unmapped, and left to the explorer to discover. Although we had excellent directions to the ruin, our first attempt at finding it took us on a bushwhacking expedition of about six miles over rough terrain; we discovered to our chagrin that we were hiking the north fork of Mule Canyon, not the south fork.

The hike to House On Fire is a surprisingly easy three miles round trip, a relief after the previous day’s marathon. We arrived mid-morning, the best time for photographing it, and found just a few other people, including a professional photographer who travels twice a year from Italy to photograph the Southwest. “It is the most beautiful place to photograph,” he said, and generously shared tips for capturing a fiery image of this magnificent ruin.

We camped at Natural Bridges National Monument, a park that’s often overlooked in favor of its more popular nearby siblings (Canyonlands and Arches National Parks). On the day we arrived for a visit, the monument had just reopened after the ridiculous government shutdown. We scored a campsite in the tiny campground and Eric managed to shoehorn the trailer into a site—the door opened into a juniper, but we were in!

(On a side note, on our drive to Natural Bridges we passed by an overlook for the Colorado River that had been closed by the government. How ridiculous is that, to close an overlook? We were delighted to discover that someone had somehow hauled away one of the enormous yellow concrete barriers; on the remaining barrier, they had written, “This land is my land, this land is your land. Amen!!”)

We spent three nights at Natural Bridges; in addition to hiking the North and South Forks of Mule Canyon we visited the overlooks in the park and hiked to two of the three bridges— Sipapu, a Hopi word referring to the entryway through which their ancestors emerged into the world; and Kachina, named for the spirit beings of the Pueblo tribes. The hikes were only about one and one-half miles round trip each, but with about 500 feet in elevation gain, they were steep, requiring a series of ladders, stone steps cut into the rocky hillsides, and railings.

It’s a gorgeous place; peaceful, beautiful, and little visited in comparison to the better-known National Parks. If you go, email me and I’ll make sure you have the right directions to House On Fire.

House On Fire Ruin

Gas Station In The Mountain

Resisting Government Stupidity

Colorado River Overlook

Entering Red Rock Country

Campsite Natural Bridges National Monument

Overlooking Horsecollar Ruins

Horsecollar Ruin

Kachina Bridge

Hike To Kachina Bridge

Stepping Off The Edge

Crazy Steep Winding Steps

At The Bottom Of The Canyon

Taking A Break

Sipapu Bridge From Above

Rickety Ladders On The Trail

Looking Up At Sipapu Bridge

Climbing Out Of The Canyon

Mule Canyon, North Fork

Bushwhacking The North Fork

I Don't Think This Is Right

A Ruin, But Not The Right One

Scrambling Down From The (Wrong) Ruins

Trail South Fork Mule Canyon

Trail To House On Fire

Without Reflected Light

House On Fire

House On Fire Ruin
Gas Station In The Mountain
Resisting Government Stupidity
Colorado River Overlook
Entering Red Rock Country
Campsite Natural Bridges National Monument
Overlooking Horsecollar Ruins
Horsecollar Ruin
Kachina Bridge
Hike To Kachina Bridge
Stepping Off The Edge
Crazy Steep Winding Steps
At The Bottom Of The Canyon
Taking A Break
Sipapu Bridge From Above
Rickety Ladders On The Trail
Looking Up At Sipapu Bridge
Climbing Out Of The Canyon
Mule Canyon, North Fork
Bushwhacking The North Fork
I Don't Think This Is Right
A Ruin, But Not The Right One
Scrambling Down From The (Wrong) Ruins
Trail South Fork Mule Canyon
Trail To House On Fire
Without Reflected Light
House On Fire
House On Fire Ruin  thumbnail
Gas Station In The Mountain  thumbnail
Resisting Government Stupidity  thumbnail
Colorado River Overlook  thumbnail
Entering Red Rock Country  thumbnail
Campsite Natural Bridges National Monument  thumbnail
Overlooking Horsecollar Ruins thumbnail
Horsecollar Ruin  thumbnail
Kachina Bridge  thumbnail
Hike To Kachina Bridge  thumbnail
Stepping Off The Edge  thumbnail
Crazy Steep Winding Steps  thumbnail
At The Bottom Of The Canyon  thumbnail
Taking A Break thumbnail
Sipapu Bridge From Above  thumbnail
Rickety Ladders On The Trail  thumbnail
Looking Up At Sipapu Bridge  thumbnail
Climbing Out Of The Canyon  thumbnail
Mule Canyon, North Fork  thumbnail
Bushwhacking The North Fork  thumbnail
I Don't Think This Is Right  thumbnail
A Ruin, But Not The Right One  thumbnail
Scrambling Down From The (Wrong) Ruins  thumbnail
Trail South Fork Mule Canyon  thumbnail
Trail To House On Fire  thumbnail
Without Reflected Light thumbnail
House On Fire   thumbnail